4 hidden Google Maps tricks you should know now


4 hidden Google Maps tricks you should know now

google-maps-logo-1
Angela Lang/CNET
Driving is stressful enough, but it becomes even more of a task when you can't find a parking spot or you lose signal and a turn is coming up soon. Fortunately, the Google Maps app for Android and iPhone ( ) can remove a bit of the strain of driving with some of its hidden features.
You probably know that with the Google Maps app, you can save addresses -- such as work and home -- so with a tap you can get directions to the places you frequently travel to. You can also get information about a place -- including what to eat, where to say and what to do -- to help you make the most of a trip. 
But Google Maps can help with other tasks you may not know about, such as letting you download a map to use offline, include stops to your driving time to get a more accurate destination time and even help you find somewhere to park. Read on to learn how to use these features so your trip will be super smooth. 

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Apple and Google prove camera software is more important than megapixels


Apple and Google prove camera software is more important than megapixels
Pixel 4 XL vs iPhone 11 Pro Max back sides
Camera prowess has become the defining factor of the modern smartphone, as the new Google Pixel 4 and Apple iPhone 11 series, among a few other new releases, have shown. Come out with the best camera experience available and the praise will flow. This photography phenomenon isn’t reserved for the flagship market — great pictures are selling cheap phones too.
However, these two markets are completely at odds with their approach to cameras. In the more affordable tiers, smartphones offer 48-, 64-, and soon 108-megapixel sensors. They’re applying the old theory that bigger numbers must be better. But ask Apple, Google, and Samsung, and they’ll tell you that just 12 megapixels are all you need, and the results seem to agree with the flagship tier players.

Beware of the megapixel temptation


While megapixels look great on paper, converting them into good looking images is another job entirely.
A number of the high-resolution cameras we’ve seen on the market produce very blurry looking pictures lacking in detail. The reason is that there’s more than just pixel counting to make a good looking image. This includes a high-quality lens and high-end image processing algorithms. Some phones can pull off very detailed images, such as the Huawei Mate 30 Pro, but more affordable handset falls short.
Not convinced? Check out this example image below. I’ve pitted the 48MP Honor 9X against the 12MP Pixel 3. This isn’t a far comparison based on price but proves the megapixel point. It’s pretty clear which crop captures the most detail. Honor 9X - 48MPHonor 9X - 48MP
Google Pixel 3 - 12MP
Honor 9X - 48MPGoogle Pixel 3 - 12MPGoogle Pixel 3 - 12MP

The best phone cameras improved a lot in 2019, but their hardware isn't vastly different.
A key reason for this is that these huge megapixel sensors all use a technology called “pixel binning.” Rather than a traditional Bayer color filter, these use a Quad-Bayer filter pattern. In reality, these cameras have a color resolution closer to one-quarter of their pixel count. So a 48MP pixel binning camera is more like a 12MP camera, 64MP closer to 16MP, and 108MP closer to 27MP in terms of real resolvable detail. That’s presuming a cheaper smartphone company does a decent job with the lenses too, which is unlikely.
The bottom line is don’t trust the numbers, trust the images. So far, these huge megapixel sensors have mostly been a disappointment.

Computational photography is the future

Google Pixel 4 camera closeup

While the megapixel race has produced more than a few disappointments, the flagship tier of the market has barely changed hardware in several years. Instead, high-end products have improved their imaging capabilities through the use of computational photography.
Improvements in image processing are producing better detail, white balance, and colors in both daylight and low light. Computational photography is also powering many of our favorite camera features, including night modes, bokeh depth-of-field effects, and AI scene detection. For examples of computational photography in action, see the excellent quality of Apple’s low-light pictures, Huawei’s 5x hybrid zoom, or the Pixel 4’s astrophotography capabilities.
Image processing capabilities are harder to convey than megapixel counting, but Apple and Google prove this is the way forward.
We’re already seeing a few of these techniques make their way to more affordable handsets. Night mode and software bokeh capabilities can be found in nearly all phones just a year or so after being flagship exclusives. However, the cost of advanced image processing and machine learning hardware is currently keeping the most advanced computational photography algorithms in more expensive phones, at least for now.
Today’s best smartphone shooters aren’t just dependant on great camera hardware, they make use of bleeding-edge image processing and machine learning components too. Apple, Huawei, and Samsung have doubled down on the capabilities inside their in-house processors, while Google is in on the trend with its additional Neural Core processor. These chips are essential for running these advanced imaging algorithms efficiently without draining all your battery life.
Eventually, these capabilities will make their way to more affordable phones and manufacturers may drop their camera resolutions to help process the image data more efficiently. In the meantime, mid-range smartphones are opting for higher resolution sensors to make themselves appear competitive. But the future of mobile photography lies firmly in smarter, more advanced processing capabilities.
Want to learn more about what computational photography has in store for smartphone cameras? Check out the video above. Now, more than ever consumers should be wary of using megapixels as a barometer of quality.
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Google Maps update will help you find historical landmarks in major cities


Google Maps update will help you find historical landmarks in major cities


Google Maps update will help you find historical landmarks in major cities
We're thinking that the Google Maps team is fueled by pots and pots of coffee. How else can you explain the number of new features that are added to the app? Developers must pull 24-hour shifts a few days a week and we envision a whiteboard filled with multiple ideas. The latest addition to Google Maps, as spotted by Android Police , allows users to quickly find major landmarks in big cities. Note the words "major" and "big." In other words, you're not going to see one of these large icons appearing on a map of a one-horse town to show you where the local Dairy Queen is.
On the other hand, as you can see from the screenshots accompanying this article, the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City, Big Ben, Buckingham Palace and Westminster Abby in London and the Arc de Triomphe and Eiffel Tower in Paris do feature the larger icon. It appears that Google is placing these easier to spot icons next to older landmarks that have a history behind them. Interestingly, the White House doesn't merit one of the larger icons although New York's Rockefeller Center does. Whether Google is currently in the process of adding new landmarks is unknown, but it would be interesting to know what the company's criteria is. We have reached out to Google for more details, and if they respond we will update this story.
Meanwhile, the version of Google Maps that we are running on our Android phone is 10.28.2. Those using iOS will also find the larger landmark icons on Google Maps version 5.29.8. If you don't have Google Maps on your phone, you can install it from the Google Play Store or the Apple App Store
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How to clear cookies on your Windows 10 computer in 3 different browsers


How to clear cookies on your Windows 10 computer in 3 different browsers


  • You can clear your cookies on your Windows 10 computer to free up space and remove the browser activity from your hard drive.
  • Cookies are the saved files your browser makes as you visit websites to remember information and load quicker. 
  • Deleting cookies removes them from your browser history and from your hard drive. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.
The personal ads you see have started getting a little too personal, and it's making you uncomfortable.
You're worried about what someone might see over your shoulder if you type certain letters into your address bar and it autocompletes.
Or maybe you just played too many games on your browser and the saves are bloating your hard drive.

Different browsers store their own cookies, so if you use multiple browsers you'll need to do this multiple times. Alternatively, you may only need to clear the cookies from one browser.
There are many reasons you might want to get rid of cookies. Here's how.
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Galaxy S11e Will Have Insane 120Hz Display Refresh Rate Predicts Tiipster


Galaxy S11e Will Have Insane 120Hz Display Refresh Rate Predicts Tiipster

Now that we're done with this year's flagship smartphone cycle, it's time to start looking at the future. Korean tech giant Samsung started the year on a high note this year after it launched the Galaxy S10 lineup. The three smartphones completely overhauled the lineup's design, and feature new camera and biometric sensors. However, just as we're about to exit 2019, a critical security flaw in the Galaxy S10 and S10 Plus' ultrasonic fingerprint sensor rendered it useless. Now, we've got the first report on what to expect from Samsung's Galaxy S11e next year, and if the details are accurate, then the device will prove sufficient for a lot of users. Take a look below for the details.

Samsung Galaxy S11e Might Resemble iPhone Formwise, Feature 90Hz - 120Hz Display Refresh Rate

This year, both Apple and Samsung chose to wait out on the display refresh rate race and launched all their flagships without 90Hz panels. These displays were initially popularized by gaming smartphones. Then, OnePlus' decision to equip its smartphones with 90Hz refresh displays, when followed by Google's choice to introduce a similar feature on the Pixels 4 put Apple and Samsung in the limelight.
Soon after, we were treated to supply chain reports suggesting that Apple is interested in 120Hz display panels for the iPhone 12; panels that utilize ProMotion tech already present on the iPad Pro. Then, Samsung went ahead and made a big move with the Exynos 990. The Korean tech giant's latest 7nm EUV SoC is capable of supporting display refresh rates of up to 120Hz.

In this vein, tipster Ice_Universe is out with some fresh Galaxy S11 lineup predictions on Weibo. This time, the details are for the Galaxy S11e, and if they materialize then Samsung will have brought a big feature to its least priciest Galaxy S smartphone next year. Ice believes that the Samsung Galaxy S11e will come in a form factor similar to the iPhone due to a thinner chin that its predecessor and a punch-hole front camera sensor cutout.
The tipster goes on to mention that the S11e will also feature a 120Hz or a 90Hz display panel. This is big news, especially if Samsung manages to cost-effectively equip the device with the former. By doing so, the company will have undercut smartphones from Google and OnePlus by offering users a premium feature in a compact form factor. The upgrade will entice users who use their smartphones for gaming but aren't bothered with photography.
What we believe that Samsung needs to do with the S11 lineup is to improve the smartphones' biometric recognition. It's embarrassing to have your best smartphones' security is bypassed through a simply gel screen protector. Thoughts> let us know what you think in the comments section below and stay tuned. We'll keep you updated on the latest.
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Whatsapp Introduces “Fingerprint Lock” Feature For Android


Whatsapp Introduces “Fingerprint Lock” Feature For Android

When it comes to instant messaging, Whatsapp is one among the few highly patronised platforms. And with each passing day, the creators look for ways to keep improving the service with new and exciting features.
Recall earlier this year, they rolled out Touch ID and Face ID for iPhone to provide an extra layer of security for WhatsApp users.
Well, it appears Android users now have  a new feature as compensation.
Whatsapp revealed via their blog that it is introducing similar authentication, allowing you to unlock the app with your fingerprint, on supported Android phones.
In order to enable this feature, simply tap Settings > Account > Privacy > Fingerprint lock. Turn on Unlock with fingerprint, and confirm your fingerprint. Voila! You’re good to go!
SOUCRCE
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Blue spaces: why time spent near water is the secret of happiness


Blue spaces: why time spent near water is the secret of happiness


After her mother’s sudden death, Catherine Kelly felt the call of the sea. She was in her 20s and had been working as a geographer in London away from her native Ireland. She spent a year in Dublin with her family, then accepted an academic position on the west coast, near Westport in County Mayo. “I thought: ‘I need to go and get my head cleared in this place, to be blown away by the wind and nature.’”
Kelly bought a little house in a remote area and surfed, swam and walked a three-mile-long beach twice a day. “I guess the five or six years that I spent there on the wild Atlantic coast just healed me, really.”
She didn’t understand why that might be until some years later, when she started to see scientific literature that proved what she had long felt intuitively to be true: that she felt much better by the sea. For the past eight years, Kelly has been based in Brighton, researching “outdoor wellbeing” and the therapeutic effects of nature – particularly of water.
In recent years, stressed-out urbanites have been seeking refuge in green spaces, for which the proven positive impacts on physical and mental health are often cited in arguments for more inner-city parks and accessible woodlands. The benefits of “blue space” – the sea and coastline, but also rivers, lakes, canals, waterfalls, even fountains – are less well publicised, yet the science has been consistent for at least a decade: being by water is good for body and mind.
Proximity to water – especially the sea – is associated with many positive measures of physical and mental wellbeing, from higher levels of vitamin D to better social relations. “Many of the processes are exactly the same as with green space – with some added benefits,” says Dr Mathew White, a senior lecturer at the University of Exeter and an environmental psychologist with BlueHealth, a programme researching the health and wellbeing benefits of blue space across 18 (mostly European) countries.
An extensive 2013 study on happiness in natural environments – to White’s mind, “one of the best ever” – prompted 20,000 smartphone users to record their sense of wellbeing and their immediate environment at random intervals. Marine and coastal margins were found by some distance to be the happiest locations, with responses approximately six points higher than in a continuous urban environment. The researchers equated it to “the difference between attending an exhibition and doing housework”. People walking beside a canal
The benefits of ‘blue space’ – the sea, but also rivers, lakes, canals, waterfalls, even fountains – are less well publicised than green space. Photograph: tottoto/Getty Images
Although living within 1km (0.6 miles) of the coast – and to a lesser extent, within 5km (3.1 miles) – has been associated with better general and mental health, it seems to be the propensity to visit that is key. “We find people who visit the coast, for example, at least twice weekly tend to experience better general and mental health,” says Dr Lewis Elliott, also of the University of Exeter and BlueHealth. “Some of our research suggests around two hours a week is probably beneficial, across many sectors of society.” Even sea views have been associated with better mental health.
White says there are three established pathways by which the presence of water is positively related to health, wellbeing and happiness. First, there are the beneficial environmental factors typical of aquatic environments, such as less polluted air and more sunlight. Second, people who live by water tend to be more physically active – not just with water sports, but walking and cycling.
Third – and this is where blue space seems to have an edge over other natural environments – water has a psychologically restorative effect. White says spending time in and around aquatic environments has consistently been shown to lead to significantly higher benefits, in inducing positive mood and reducing negative mood and stress, than green space does.
People of all socioeconomic groups go to the coast to spend quality time with friends and family. Dr Sian Rees, a marine scientist at the University of Plymouth, says the coastline is Britain’s “most socially levelling environment”, whereas forests tend to be accessed by high-income earners. “It’s not seen as being elite or a special place, it’s where we just go and have fun.
“By spending time in these environments, you’re getting what we call ‘health by stealth’ – enjoying the outdoors, interacting with the physical environment – and that also has some different health benefits.”
Even a fountain may do. A 2010 study (of which White was lead author) found that images of built environments containing water were generally rated just as positively as those of only green space; researchers suggested that the associated soundscape and the quality of light on water might be enough to have a restorative effect.
Although participants rated large bodies of water higher than other aquatic environments (and “swampy areas” were rated significantly less positively), the study suggested that any water is better than none – presenting opportunities for beneficial blue space to be designed or retrofitted. “You can’t change where the coast is, but when we’re talking about translating the benefits to other types of environments, there is nothing to stop a well-designed urban fountain,” says Elliott.
“People work with what they have,” says Kelly. When she lived in London, she would head for the Thames when she had a spare 10 minutes “and recalibrate”. Then, four times a year, she would go to Brighton “and the benefits would keep me going for the next few months – so I didn’t get into a place of being overwhelmed or stressed, just keeping myself topped up”.
The coast does seem to be especially effective, however. White suggests this is due to the ebb and flow of the tides. He points out that rumination – focusing on negative thoughts about one’s distress – is an established factor in depression. “What we find is that spending time walking on the beach, there’s a transition towards thinking outwards towards the environment, thinking about those patterns – putting your life in perspective, if you like.” A walk along a beach
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